Choosing a Wedding Videographer

Zoom in on the latest wedding video trends, and find the best match for your needs. Then, choose the video pro to make it happen.

Even more than photographs, a wedding video truly captures the spirit and magic of your big day—in living color. And, thanks to advancements in digital technology, the quality of these videos has improved dramatically over the years. Instead of using the large, obtrusive analog (VHS) cameras that were standard 10 years ago, most videographers now shoot with small, discreet digital video cameras.

Also, you'll probably get a video mastered in DVD format, ensuring better picture quality and a shelf life of 100 years (as opposed to 15 years with a VHS tape). What can you expect your video to look like? Here's an overview of your options, plus how to get the most for your money, and some tips on finding the right pro.

Basic Service

"Point-and-shoot" videographers, as they're known, provide only elementary documentation of your day, so they're your least expensive option (around $1,000). If you've seen any of your friends' wedding videos…well, you get the picture.

While these videos adequately deliver a record of the events, some brides have told us that their "point-and-shoot" videos look a bit cheesy, thanks to the pros' use of gimmicky animated graphics and sound effects—you might want to tell your pro to tone down these kinds of treatments.

Also, tell your videographer not to approach your guests, prodding them to "say a few words" to the camera: This is considered very passé. And be sure to specify the music you want included in the soundtrack (videographers tell us that a popular pick is "The Blower's Daughter," by Damien Rice, which was featured in the movie Closer).

Next: Tips on Finding "The One" >>